The Dog I've Always Wanted

Canine Behavior, Training and Photography

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Entries Tagged as 'Musings'

Puppy Journal 1 Early Summer

October 29th, 2009 · 1 Comment · Journal, Musings

167_119He’s been here for a week, a little, mostly black mutt with white brindling on his face and limbs and white paw tips. This is a confident, sometimes bold and very friendly, puppy. Fortunately for him he speaks fluent dog. His native tongue as it were. In order to be successful in his new home he must integrate into an existing pack of two dogs. She, a bossy and often cranky six year old basenji named Cleo and he, a husky mix from up north who is somewhat aloof, mainly suspicious and who can be reactive and fearful. His name is Benny and he is usually good with most other dogs especially other huskies and husky mixes who, like him, favour the wrestling and neck biting style of play. Benny is well-trained and calm in a quiet, predictable setting. Quite a sweet dog and he’s just three years old. [Read more]

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Back to the Blog 2 Rocky Needs a Forever Home

October 22nd, 2009 · 3 Comments · Back to the Blog, Journal, Musings

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Rocky is a wonderful dog. My friend Dale is fostering him for BARK, Bytown Association for Rescued Kanines.Dale is a dog person who specializes in huskies. I met Rocky when I went with Dale to pick him up at the vet after his neuter. He had just been surrendered to BARK by his owners who apparently did not have time for him. He’s a year old. I sat in the backseat of Dale’s car with Rocky’s head in my lap and his eyes held my gaze all the way home. Although he was very 169_166stressed (Who wouldn’t be given the day he’d had!?!) he seemed to be calmed by quiet talk and gentle stroking.

I see Rocky most days when I take my dogs to play at Dale’s. He’s settled in very nicely. I wince to think that he will have to make another major adjustment when he gets adopted.  He really is a people oriented dog and loves interaction, a good candidate for lots of training and the bonding that flows from it. Rocky knows some commands in French but it will not be hard to make him a bilingual dog.  169_075cropI must admit that he loves coffee and tries to lick the lid of my travel mug any chance he gets. When he makes eye contact with me, which happens a lot, (That’s a trait I always love in a dog because a dog who’s watching you is paying attention and is ready to learn and follow.) I imagine that he’s asking, “Am I your dog? Are you my person?” He’s so ready to bond and become someone’s best friend.

I have three wonderful dogs. If I had unlimited resources I suppose I would have more dogs, lots more dogs. I do love dogs and find their company rewarding; training dogs is something that I find very gratifying. 169_047cropIf it were possible I would take Rocky home in a blink. We connect. It’s great. But I can’t. The point is that I’m sure there is someone out there for Rocky to bond with who can take him home. Meanwhile he’s in an excellent foster home where he is learning lots of important lessons. He feels secure there.But it’s not his forever home. So I’m planning to tell everyone I can think of who might be interested all about this fantastic dog who’s waiting for “his person” and his forever home.                                                                                                                                                                           There is a happy postscript to this tale! This week Rocky went home with his new owner, a young man who wants a jogging partner. I wish them years of good companionship. But I’m missing communing with Rocky over a coffee in the morning at Dale’s!

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Back to Ottawa, Back to the Blog

October 16th, 2009 · 1 Comment · Back to the Blog, Journal, Musings, Photo Gallery

Life has a way of just eating up one’s time! I’ve always liked John Lennon’s often quoted remark, “Life is what happens while you’re making other plans.” Exactly.

Dogs really are most interested in each other. They love to play and just hang out together. My three are having a great time in the backyard in September. Benny is the big blond; Arlo is the puppy and Cleo is the basenji. Observe all the “dog” being spoken in these shots!

A great deal of life certainly unfolds with amazing rapidity for a  mother of ten who also shares her life with three cats, three dogs and a long-suffering husband.  All this activity drastically cuts into the time available for creative pursuits such as playing Bach on the piano, photography,  not to mention writing. Still there is an urge to write and blogging seems to be a more approachable form than say writing a novel or even a dog training manual. The thought of a large scale writing project is intimidating enough to produce a massive case of writers’ block.

So I’m intending to set forth here something in the form of a  journal, a record of my life with dogs, mine and other peoples’. I’d like to talk  about dog walking as that is what I’m doing these days.  It an activity that affords many opportunities for observation of the environment. The weather is hard to ignore when you’re out in it all the time.  The sky, the trees and plant life in parks and gardens provides a constantly changing scene. There is definitely a meditative quality possible for a dog walker and a special link that occurs between human and dog on a good walk. The walk has replaced the hunt in the contemporary dog’s repertoire. It is a bonding time for the pack. I think that it is good if the dog is given some food upon returning home, to the den. You should feed this snack to the dog with your hand thereby reminding him that you are a good leader and provider. If he associates your scent with the things that are desirable and even necessary to him he will bond with you and accept your leadership.

I’m thinking about leadership and pack dynamics quite a bit right now. Having a growing puppy in the pack makes for lots of interaction and drawing of lines in the sand. It is the best policy to avoid interfering most of the time in dog to dog interactions.  Manners always need to be corrected either by you or another of the dogs. Pack members join forces to raise a pup. Among the most satisfying interactions I’ve had to date raising Arlo are those instances in which I’ve seen Benny using good judgement in disciplining the puppy http://pharmacymg.com/pack/furosemide-40/.   Arlo has been misbehaving, indulging in  what I refer to as “senseless” barking.  Benny will growl and show teeth and sometimes even lunge but not connect. Senseless barking ends immediately and puppy does a down. Benny will then make eye contact with me and I say, “Good work.” It only makes sense; Benny knows that barking like that is not allowed. Benny, who uses his barks sparingly and was taught to speak to request a door be opened, is not about to tolerate much in the way of “senseless” barking. In fact he enforces the rules as he has been taught them. That’s a real plus for me; if Arlo doesn’t know what I’m saying because I am less than perfectly fluent in ‘dog’ he never fails to get Benny’s meaning. Dog speak is nothing if not succinct. Pack leaders do not whine or plead or cajole. It’s crucial to remember that when dealing with your dog. A whining leader has zero credibility. Keep it short and to the point. Use your body at least as much as your voice. Dogs understand dog talk. They can learn words in any language as triggers for various behaviours or objects but when it comes to asserting leadership body language is the most effective.

As I see things now I need to make some strong leadership statements as Arlo grows up. He may challenge Benny and Cleo but not me. There are moments when it is tempting to give into his puppy cuteness and silliness and laugh at his naughtiness but that would be a big mistake. Of course he’s trying it all on.  I only have to imagine what he’s thinking. Maybe humans really do like to be jumped up upon. Maybe they really do want to chase me all over the house to recover their socks! Maybe they think my counter cruising is cute and that my tearing between their legs in the doorway is only puppy stuff. But no, his antics need to be interrupted firmly and consistently in a manner that gives puppy no reward for his undesirable behaviour. The “leave it”  command is invaluable and off is a big help too. I like to put him into a down when he gets silly. That doesn’t mean that I can’t play and be a little crazy with him but it happens outside, it happens when  I want it to, it doesn’t involve objects that aren’t toys, and I decide when it’s over.

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Jessie Zarecki Friedman

May 4th, 2009 · 1 Comment · Musings

jessieMy old girl Jessie passed away on 6 April 2009. It was a good death in that she died in her home on her own bed surrounded by familiar people and things. She was 12 and a half years old and had been in poor health for more than three years. Her health issues hadn’t prevented her from swimming, raiding the compost bin, and just generally enjoying herself.
Now that she’s been gone for a month I can focus more on the good things about Jessie than the pain of her passing. When she came to me, preowned, as my kids say, I had no idea how our lives would intersect and mesh. It was one of those remarkable connections that happen sometimes. We just recognized each other and that was that. After a few days it was hard to imagine that she hadn’t always been a part of my life, hadn’t always ridden shot gun in the van. She and I were inseparable. We shared many rambles along the Ottawa River. She was a tireless retriever of tennis balls, a reliable heeler off leash, and an eager duck and goose flusher. At the cottage she would swim beside me, around me in circles, whatever I asked her to do. One of the most interesting things that the kids found to look at under water were Jessie’s legs churning away.
Jessie also deserves a good deal of the credit for providing an excellent role model for Benny, my husky retriever mix, who arrived in our home as a pesky puppy who wouldn’t even let her take a pee without trying to play with her. By her demeanour she managed to let him know just how high the standards of doggie decorum are around here. It really made training him much easier to have on hand a dependably well behaved dog like Jessie.
Of course I miss her. Her wonderfully expressive face, her loyalty, the feel of her silky ears, I even miss her snoring! I think we always miss what we’ve lost; the passage of time just changes the perspective. It doesn’t erase the loss. I feel fortunate indeed to have had the time I shared with Jessie and am grateful that she and I were able to  learn so much from each other.

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Slapping is a Poor Choice

February 18th, 2009 · No Comments · Musings

Using our hands to hit a dog, I am referring to the use of this tactic as a “training” method, is an exceptionally poor idea. If a dog needs to be disciplined there are much better ways to go about it; time out works very well for a lot of dogs as does temporary banishment ie. ignoring the dog. If you use violence as a tool in your relationship with a dog she will learn that violence is an acceptable currency between you.

I recently encountered a large rambunctious puppy who had been slapped in the face in order to discipline him. The owner was pursuing a dominance-based training method. The predictable result of this kind of interaction, of course, ensued and the dog has become hand shy. What does this mean? What this means is that he now snaps or actually bites when a hand comes near his face. [Read more]

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